Our Liberty Virtual High School will provide a full option for virtual learning for all students desiring to learn from home.

Our School

  • Students at the high school level have choices when it comes to online learning. Starting Fall 2020, we will be offering a full-time high school experience online where:

    • Students will follow a “school schedule” Monday through Friday
    • Students will be able to transition between virtual and face-to-face at the beginning/end of each semester
    • Parents and students will receive technology support as needed
    • Students enrolling in virtual learning will remain connected to their home school in Liberty

Virtual Course Offerings

  • The following courses are available for full time Liberty Virtual School students. Courses listed with an asterisk* indicates online courses our students can also take as a complement to our face-to-face learning environment. Contact your guidance counselor for more information.

    Algebra I (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Algebra I is organized around the families of functions, with special emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students will learn to represent them in multiple ways as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. These functions will be applied and used to model real-world situations in order to solve arising problems. Students will also learn data analysis and apply geometric properties in the algebraic realm.

    Algebra II (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Algebra II continues the study of algebra, the representation of quantities using variables and mathematical operations to show relationships. Students will represent relationships and functions with linear equations and explore relationships of direct and indirect variation. Students will explore quadratic functions and perform operations with complex numbers. Polynomials and their properties will be explored and graphed. Students will explore exponential relationships, logarithmic functions, and probabilities.

    American Government* (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    LV Government is a yearlong online class that focuses on how the United States political system functions and understanding basic economic concepts.  Particular emphasis is placed on the US Constitution and how it impacts the three branches of government. The class will consist of online textbook readings, primary document analysis (i.e., John Locke, Declaration of Independence), online discussion boards, and student inquiry into how the government works and the role of a citizen.  The state requires all students pass the following in order to receive a high school diploma: US Citizenship Test, US Constitution Test, & Missouri Constitution Test. This course will also have an EOC in April. As a virtual class, students will still have deadlines to complete coursework; however, will have the freedom to manage their time in order to meet those deadlines.  Students will need to be self motivated and organized, but will still have access to the teacher of the course through Canvas. Regular communication with the teacher will be an expectation. 

    American History (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This year-long course begins with the Reconstruction Period and examines historical events and trends to the modern day. Major early concepts investigated will be Industrialization and growth of the United States, the early 1900s, Imperialism, the Progressive Movement, Isolationism, World War I, the Depression and New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, and Post-Cold War America. Students will be required to actively participate in their learning, as several unit projects will be completed.

    Art Foundations - Digital (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This course is a yearlong introductory course. Students will explore the elements and principles in a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional media.

    Art History* (semester .5 credit)
    Art history is about learning to appreciate art through the ages. While we will spend time on the history of art, we will also look at contemporary artists and their impact. One goal is to broaden your perspective on the world.. Exposure to art can begin to develop appreciation, however, to really tap into your thinking skills you will be asked to categorize, analyze, and evaluate art, architecture, and design. Throughout the course you will be given opportunities to ask questions. You may be a naturally curious person or this may be challenging but asking questions will foster your natural interests, encourage thinking outside your comfort zone, and encourage you to find answers. We will dive into the following questions in art history:

    • What is art?
    • How is it made?
    • How and why does art change?
    • How can we describe our thinking about art?
    • How is art infused into daily life?

    Band (year long, .5 each semester) - Performing Arts - Independent Study
    If you are already in band class you can continue your learning of your craft in this virtual setting. You will work with the band you have been assigned to virtually and work independently on your craft and/or in an ensemble.  Students must provide their own instruments and accessories, (i.e. lyres, gloves, reeds, mutes and percussion sticks/mallets) Performances may be virtually or face to face. 

    Biology* (year long and/or credit recovery, .5 each semester)
    In this course, you will explore a wide variety of biological topics which you will use to expand your science knowledge. We will discuss topics ranging from atoms to biomes and everything else in between! Get ready for a great adventure!!! This course runs for one school year - broken down into 2 semesters.

    Child Development* (semester, .5 credit)
    In Intro to Child Development, you will focus on the responsibilities involved in pregnancy, birth, and caring for children. The evaluation of physical, emotional, and intellectual development of children is also covered. Understanding the developmental tasks and growth patterns of children will allow you to recognize individual differences in children. Throughout the course, you will develop a broader understanding of how and why children respond in everyday situations.

    Choir (year long, .5 each semester) - Performing Arts - Independent Study
    If you are already in choir class you can continue your learning of your craft in this virtual setting. You will work with the choir you have been assigned to virtually and work independently on your craft and/or in an ensemble. Performances may be virtually or face to face.

    Competitive Theater (year long, .5 each semester) - Performing Arts - Independent Study
    Competitive Theatre is a year-long course designed to offer a variety of performance experiences at the interscholastic competition level. Students will explore literature for performances that will include children's storytelling, humorous and dramatic interpretation, duo improvisation, duo interpretation poetry, prose, storytelling, one-act play, reader's theatre, original oratory, and extemporaneous speaking. Students will prepare for competition and rehearse independently, in groups, and with private direction. Participation in four inter-scholastic forensic tournaments is required. Many tournaments will be virtual for the 2020-2021 school year. This commitment includes rehearsal, in addition to classroom hours.

    Computer Applications (semester, .5 credit)
    Details TBD

    Debate - (year long, .5 each semester) - Performing Arts - Independent Study
    Debate I is a year-long course designed to teach the skills of analysis, research, and reasoning. Students learn to logically develop and organize rational arguments on both sides of controversial subjects and defend those arguments thoughtfully and articulately from the attack of others. Coursework includes the study of basic debate theory, topic analysis, the completion of written assignments such as evidence cards, simple case formats, briefs, persuasive speeches, and participation in practice and competitive debates on a novice level. Students accumulate points for membership in the National Forensics League. Participation in four interscholastic debate and forensics tournaments during the year is required. This commitment includes rehearsal in addition to classroom hours. Many tournaments will be virtual for the 2020-2021 school year. 

    English 9 (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This course is designed to cover many aspects of communication, including reading, writing, speaking, listening, and information literacy. Literature study will include a variety of selected readings including essays, short stories, novels, and plays. Composition will be a significant part of this course with specific instruction in the development of thesis statements, multi-paragraph essays, and writing for different purposes and audiences. The conventions of writing will also be emphasized. Writing will be enhanced through the use of computers and other electronic resources.

    English 10 (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This year-long course integrates the study of literature with the writing process. Students will develop techniques for literary analysis and demonstrate attendant critical thinking skills. Finally, students will research specified topics using a variety of resources and will provide documentation consistent with MLA manuscript format. Novels include Fahrenheit 451 and Of Mice and Men.

    English 11* (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This course is equivalent to the study in a face-to-face ELA 11 class. It is a year-long course that focuses on further developing reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking skills. Students will further develop techniques for literary analysis and research. They will read, analyze, and respond in writing to various literary genres in American literature as well as various novels, review usage and mechanics and continue to develop vocabulary. An experiential component to the course is required each semester of the course including attending a theatrical performance and a job shadow.

    English 12* (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    English Language Arts 12 is a year-long course for seniors which explores various themes and topics common to life in the late 20th and early 21st Centuries through the use of modern novels, short stories, and poetry. Students will exhibit an understanding of theme, point of view, plot, and conflict in assigned works through close reading and analysis, online class discussions, and written expression through a variety of essays and written assignments. Students will also work on developing independent reading skills and considering a multitude of cultural and social justice issues. Students will participate in an experiential learning project where their learning will extend beyond the virtual classroom and into the community around them.

    Entrepreneurship (semester, .5 credit)
    Details TBD

    Environmental Science* (semestser, .5 credit)
    Environmental Science is designed to help students become familiar with environmental concepts to better understand the world around them and to build upon in subsequent science coursework. Investigations, tutorials, and assignments are designed to help students better understand the environment and how it impacts our daily lives. You will also be able to discuss your views with your classmates and instructor and apply what you are learning to decisions we make about the environment.

    Geometry (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Geometry is the study of figures, their properties, and their role in the world around us. Students will learn how to identify, measure, describe, and classify geometric figures such as lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, and various solid figures. Students will use reasoning skills and known properties to explore and prove certain relationships such as congruence, similarity, and transformations.

    Health* (semester, .5 credit)
    Health Education is a semester course that is an introduction to health topics relevant to today’s high school student.  Topics covered provide a solid background of knowledge to assist students in making healthy decisions as they move into young adulthood.  This class is designed to give students an awareness to be health literate. Functions of human body systems will be reviewed. Health components such as personal health habits, nutrition and stress management will be studied.  Prevention and control of disease will be covered. Health risk factors such as violence and substance abuse will be examined. Students will be able to develop a fitness program, cover mental illnesses, and be aware of the media in today’s society.  We will also cover various types of cancer and causes, different genres of drugs and the effects on the human body as well as society, prescription drugs, and the effects alcohol.

    Interpersonal Development* (semester, .5 credit)
    Learning to be a responsible adult and to become successful members of society is what this course will encourage as well as being positive critical thinkers and problem solvers. Areas of study will include; understanding oneself, relationships, family systems, career aptitude, communication, coping skills. The course will also include marriage and family, the effects of health on our overall well-being, financial responsibility, mental health, and lifespan development. The course content will promote the development of the skills necessary for a successful career and family in today's changing world. 

    Introduction to Business* (semester, .5 credit)
    This course is designed to introduce students to business operations in a global economy while providing a foundation for future business courses. Students will attain an understanding of how management, technology, marketing, accounting, entrepreneurship, and human resources impact the workplace. Students will explore social responsibility and ethics, basic economics, and practical applications of business software while connecting with classmates and teacher through discussion boards and online activities. This course will have a half day on campus field trip to engage in mock interviews with external business people which will be set up by the instructor.

    Music Appreciation* (semester, .5 credit)
    From classical to modern to hip hop our society is immersed in music influence. Students will explore the vast eras and genres of music through the ages. Exposure to music can begin to develop appreciation, however, to really tap into your thinking skills you will be asked to categorize, analyze, and evaluate music, culture, and the creative process. 

    Orchestra (year long, .5 each semester) - Performing Arts - Independent Study
    Students will work with the orchestra they have been assigned to virtually and work independently on your craft and/or in an ensemble Large/small ensemble and solo performance is emphasized along with individual development in technique and style. Performances may be virtually or face to face.

    Personal Finance* (semester, .5 credit)
    Understanding and managing personal finances are the key to one’s future financial success.  This one-semester course presents essential knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions about real world financial issues.  As the learner, you will begin to understand how choices influence occupational options and future earning potential. This online course is designed to help encourage wise spending, saving, and credit decisions to make effective use of income in achieving personal financial success in the future.

    Physical Education* (semester, .5 credit) 
    Must have prior approval to sign up.

    Physical Science (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This introductory course emphasizes the fundamentals of both chemistry and physics as it explores the relationships between matter and energy. Areas of study will include scientific measurement, atomic theory, periodic trends, chemical reactions, forces, motion, and waves. Through these topics, students will acquire laboratory skills and enhance their problem-solving abilities, while demonstrating their knowledge of mathematical relationships.

    Pre Calculus with Trigonometry (year long, .5 credits each semester)
    This year-long course prepares college-bound students for their first semester of calculus or Advanced Placement Calculus AB. The topics covered include functions and their graphs (polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions). Also included is the study of trigonometry (sine, cosine, and tangent functions and trigonometric identities).

    Probability and Statistics (semester, .5 credit)
    This semester course in statistics and probability will give students an introduction to the skills needed to understand and analyze quantitative information that is important in today's society. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, the definition of statistics, frequency distributions, graphing techniques, methods for analyzing data, and the definition of probability, rules of probability, probability distributions, and the normal distribution.

    Psychology* (semester, .5 credit)
    Virtual Psychology I is a semester long introductory course in Psychology. This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of Psychology - the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.  It has been designed to not only provide you with the tools necessary for the study of Psychology but to present you with a sampling of the major areas of Psychology. The course begins with a short overview of how Psychology developed as an academic discipline and an introduction to a number of the principle methodologies most commonly deployed in its study. The subsequent units are arranged around broad areas of research, including Biology of Behavior, Motivation and Emotion, States of Consciousness, Learning, Memory, and Personality.

    Sociology (semester, .5 credit)
    Students will explore the origins of our values/beliefs and behaviors and society's behaviors as well as explore the concepts and theories necessary to understand society. Topics include considering sociology as science, the nature of large-and small-scale groups, social stratification, historical eras and social change, and race, ethnic, and gender relations.

    Trigonometry (semester, .5 credit)
    Trigonometry is the study of angles of the right triangle and their relationships to the lines that form them. This branch of mathematics has its greatest impact in the areas of drafting, physics, engineering, computer technology, and electronics. The topics will include basic trigonometry functions, trigonometric identities, half and double angle functions, law of sine and cosine, and application of trigonometric functions.

    Spanish I (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Throughout the course, students will develop basic communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Hispanic culture will be highlighted.

    Spanish II (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Building on the format of Spanish I, students will increase their vocabulary and will use more complex sentence structure and grammar skills in oral and written work in the present and past. Daily communication skills will be increasingly emphasized. Hispanic culture will be integrated into daily class actvities as a natural comparison of cultures.

    Theoretical Chemistry (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This introductory course provides students with a thorough understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts. A comprehensive study of chemistry involves manipulation of algebraic equations; therefore, good math skills are important. Students should expect to use algebra in performing calculations throughout the course. Topics of study include matter, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical formulas and reactions, stoichiometry, bonding, gas behavior, and pH. Students will apply their understanding of chemistry concepts in the laboratory and on individual assessments.

    World History (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    This year-long course traces the development of world history, especially western civilization, from the early days of civilization through the modern era. The contributions and interactions among major civilizations of Asia, Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East will be included as students study early world civilizations and cultures, classical Greece and Rome, religions of the world, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Exploration & Colonialism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, revolutions, Industrialism, Imperialism, nationalism, and 20th century conflicts. The impact of geography and the economic consequences of world events will be an integral component of this course. 

     


    The following courses are only offered in conjunction with our face-to-face courses and are not as part of our full-time Liberty Virtual School catalogue.

    Consumer Math* (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    In high school the traditional mathematic focus is on the core courses of Algebra 1 & 2 and Geometry with the intent of preparing students for career or college.  A valid question students often ask in these courses is “when am I ever going to use this?” The study of mathematics provides students a solid base of knowledge to draw from and is a preparation of students’ minds to observe patterns, think logically, persevere through difficult material and critically problem solve.  In truth, mathematics are used every day, it is just not defined in terms of Algebra or Geometry. We are all consumers of information daily and much of the information we are inundated with are numbers based on math. We must be able to analyze the math information thrown at us in every form to figure out if the information is valid, makes sense and how the information can be used to  inform the decisions in our lives. This course, Consumer Math, teaches us to become exceptional consumers of mathematical information. Consumer math is a bridge between what students see as esoteric mathematical concepts and the application of mathematical skills used in everyday living. The emphasis of every lesson in this course is “here is how I can use math in my life to understand things and make better decisions.”   

    A clear distinction should be drawn between consumer math and personal finance.  While there may be some overlap of concepts covered between the courses, the emphasis in consumer math is not on financial literacy, but on using math in everyday life. 

    Earth Science* (year long, .5 credit each semester)
    Earth and Space Science is designed to help students become familiar with the concepts of geology, climate, energy, and astronomy that affect their lives daily. Through weekly readings, discussions, and assignments, students will explore and better understand some of the most important, hotly debated issues of our time. Through exploring the topics in Earth and Space, students will also develop a greater appreciation for the variety and beauty of the universe in which we all live. 

    Geography* (semester, .5 credit)
    In World Geography Studies, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. Students describe the influence of geography on events of the past and present with an emphasis on contemporary issues. A significant portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems and their interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of the world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region.

    Short Stories* (semester, .5 credit)
    In this one-semester course, you will be reading short stories from American and British authors. You will learn the elements of short fiction and how those elements contribute to the overall meaning of the work. You will also learn how to identify symbols--all stories have them and all symbols contribute to the meaning of the story. Learning how to read stories by paying attention to symbols and patterns will enrich your reading experience. The more you read and notice patterns and symbols, the easier it will get so that by the end of this course, it will become automatic.  

    Social Media In Modern Society* (semester, .5 credit)
    Social Media in Modern Society" examines the impact of how various social media platforms have had cultural, economic and political impact on our lives today. The course will examine the history of social media, impact on social movements, privacy concerns, cyberbullying, marketing, maintaining a positive social media history and concerns about addiction to social media.


  • Students may also take the courses listed below via the LAUNCH platform. Course descriptions can be accessed on the LAUNCH catalog.

    Course Name

    Credit Value

    Course Length

    Credit Type

    AP Calculus AB

    1

    Year

    Math

    AP Calculus BC

    1

    Year

    Math

    AP Computer Science A

    1

    Year

    Practical Art

    AP Computer Science Principles

    1

    Year

    Practical Art

    AP English Lit & Comp

    1

    Year

    English

    AP European History

    1

    Year

    Social Studies

    AP Physics

    1

    Year

    Science

    AP Psychology

    1

    Year

    Social Studies

    AP Statistics

    1

    Year

    Math

    AP US Gov. & Politics

    1

    Year

    Social Studies

    AP US History

    1

    Year

    Social Studies

    ACT Prep

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    Employment Internship

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    FACS Internship

    0.5

    Semester

    Practical Art

    Volunteerism

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    Contemporary Lit

    1

    Year

    English Elective

    Creative Writing I

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Creative Writing II

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Film as Literature I

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Film as Literature II

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Grammar & Comp I

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Grammar & Comp II

    0.5

    Semester

    English Elective

    Introductory Speech

    1

    Year

    English Elective

    Music Theory

    1

    Year

    Fine Arts

    College Algebra

    1

    Year

    Math

    Introduction to Computer Science

    0.5

    Semester

    Practical Art

    Computer Applications

    0.5

    Semester

    Practical Art

    Digital Communications

    0.5

    Semester

    Practical Art

    Financial Accounting

    1

    Year

    Practical Art

    Web Design

    0.5

    Semester

    Practical Art

    Astronomy

    1

    Year

    Science

    American Baseball History

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    American Civil War

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    Psych. of the Holocaust

    1

    Year

    Elective

    World Geography

    0.5

    Semester

    Elective

    Chinese I

    1

    Year

    Elective

    French I

    1

    Year

    Elective

    French II

    1

    Year

    Elective

    French III

    1

    Year

    Elective

    French IV

    1

    Year

    Elective

    German I

    1

    Year

    Elective

    German II

    1

    Year

    Elective

    Japanese I

    1

    Year

    Elective

    Japanese II

    1

    Year

    Elective

    Spanish III

    1

    Year

    Elective